Breakout Ideas in IS

 

Track Chairs

Susan. J Winter, Maryland University, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Ola Henfridsson, Warwick University, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Michael Rosemann, Queensland University of Technology, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

winter Henfridsson Rosemann
     

 

This track is now a nomination only track. The description is included here so that authors can see how their paper might meet the ‘Breakout’ criteria. This track has been renamed ‘Breakout’, rather than Breakthrough, to reflect the fact that this track now focuses on papers that have the potential to create impact beyond the ivory tower, as well as challenging tired orthodoxies. We are particularly interested in the idea of impact, which is being taken up by research funders all over the world, who will not fund research unless there is demonstrated impact. The Research Council UK (RCUK 2014) say that impact embraces all the diverse ways that research-related skills benefit individuals, organizations and nations. This includes fostering economic performance, increasing the effectiveness of public services and policy, enhancing quality of life, health and creative output. This year, we would like Track Chairs to nominate those accepted papers on their track that they feel are original, challenging, and have the potential to make impact in and out of the field. The originating track will be identified in the Breakout sessions, so that the community is aware of which tracks are generating these breakout ideas and impact. We offer the following criteria for Track Chairs and their Associate Editors to help them identify a potential ‘Breakout’ paper.

  • Does it contain novel, cutting-edge, interesting ideas that come through diverse intellectual approaches, expertise, and perspectives?
  • Alternatively, does the paper have the potential to contribute to society’s grand challenges linked with energy or global food security, global uncertainties, living with environmental change, the digital potential and lifelong health and well-being?
  • Does the paper deal with other challenges that the use of information technology raises for society, such as ethics, privacy, and the dark side of social media, and does it do so in a novel and interesting way?
  • Does the paper have potential to make a significant contribution to theory outside our discipline?
  • Do the ideas in the paper have the potential to make an impact in any of the following areas: culture and society; business; health and/or quality of life; the environment; public policy, law, education or services; disruptive innovation; IT entrepreneurs; or any other area not covered by the preceding areas.

 

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